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04

Mar
2013

Information Resources

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By admin404

Google Author and Publisher Tags

March 4, 2013 - Information Resources

Google is piloting the index of author and publisher information in search results to help users discover content created by you on the various blogs and news sites on which you contribute. Adding an “author” tag to your blogs and news articles, or a “publisher” tag to your corporate news articles, press releases, and informational resources (such as this one) can help link users to additional articles on your site, or other sites, which you’ve written. The advantages to these new tags are apparent, especially considering how easy they are to implement.
Read More

Tags | author, contribute as, contributor to, google, mark-up, publisher, rich snippets, structured data testing too, tag

18

Feb
2013

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By admin404

Twitter Cards

February 18, 2013 - Information Resources

If you’re an avid user of Twitter, you’ve probably noticed the new links that show up on the bottom of certain tweets in your feed. The links say “View Summary” and allow you to read the title and excerpt of an article, along with a thumbnail of the article’s featured image. Those links are called Twitter Cards, come in three different varieties: summaries, photos, and player, and have two different layouts:  web and mobile.Read More

Tags | niall kennedy, process, tutorial, twitter cards, view summary, wordpress plug-in

18

Feb
2013

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By admin404

Above the Fold

February 18, 2013 - Information Resources

When creating mechanicals for website strategy, or Strategic UI/UX, we often make recommendations for content that should be visible above the fold. In the context of Web search/usage, the term above the fold refers to the part of the web page a user can see without having to scroll down or use the scroll bar within their web browser. In general, this space is at the top of a Web page, and is considered prime real estate for visibility and getting information seen most efficiently. The term, itself, is derived from the web’s ephemeral predecessor, the newspaper, in which the most poignant stories—the ones that would be more likely to sell that particular newspaper over competing papers—were those that were above the crease on Broadsheet or Berliner sized papers. Web strategists use the term above the scroll interchangeably with above the fold.

As browser resolutions increase, the fold mark keeps changing. In 2013, 25.4% of the world was browsing at 1366×768, as opposed to only 18.7% in 2012. And the growing availability of mobile phones and tablet devices, such as iPads, has changed the landscape to a point where we can no longer rely on a majority resolution and location of the fold. As a result, we recommend fluid, responsive layouts that accommodate for the broadest range of resolutions possible. Not only does this help clients to be able to see the most important content, while helping them to sell their services over their competitors’, but it also helps us to reorganize and strategize content based on the different types of users. For instance, a user on a phone may be more interested in contact information, a tablet user may want to read topical news or view videos, and a desktop user may want more in-depth articles and research information. Responsive layouts help gear the content toward these different demographics and re-organize what’s seen above the various folds.

That said, we’re currently in the age of Cinema (16 x 9 resolutions) and Retina (2x Device Pixel Ratios) displays. With iOS’s dock protruding into the available horizontal space and retina’s ability to scale content by pinching, the confusion over the floating fold mark is mired further.

With the one caveat that the rapidly changing environment may soon render this outdated, our recommended fold mark remains 645px for landscape orientations (with allowance for a persistent bookmarks bar) and 900px for portrait.

 

Examples of our testing can be seen below:

Safari Landscape

Safari Landscape

Chrome Landscape

Chrome Landscape

Safari Portrait

Safari Portrait

Chrome Portrait

Chrome Portrait

Safari Landscape - Bookmark Bar

Safari Landscape – Bookmark Bar

If you’re interested in learning more about fold lines, Strategic UI/UX or the changing landscape of the web, drop us a line to initiate a conversation.

Tags | above the fold, above the scroll, berliners, broadsheets, design, develpment, mechanicals, orientation, resolution, standards, strategy, tabloids, website, wireframes

12

Feb
2013

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By admin404

Scoping a Project

February 12, 2013 - Information Resources

Every year, long before the ice thaws and the ground softens, my father takes a cup of coffee out to the farthest corner of the yard and studies a medium-sized rectangle of roped off terrain that will become his garden. The footage is limited, living in a modest suburb in Michigan, but in his mind, the objectives are organized into columns and rows.

  • Anxiety: What environmental factors should be concern me?
  • Trust: Will I get out what I put in?
  • Expectations: What level of commitment should I prepare for, in terms of budget? Labor? Upkeep?
  • Comfort: What is a realistic yield for an endeavor of this size?

When breaking ground on any mission that will require his time, energy, and resources, my father knows that thorough, comprehensive planning, coupled with a solid foundation, will make all the difference in the success of his venture.Read More

Tags | application, application scope, blueprint, digital, organization, planning, preparation, project scope, scope, scope diagram, site scope, spreadsheet, strategy, web, web site

23

Oct
2012

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By admin404

Disabling Caching with .htaccess

October 23, 2012 - Information Resources

For our friends and fellow designers who would rather not have to perpetually clear browser cache while fine-tuning CSS, Actionscript, ads or procedural images, you might want to have a look at the following apache/.htaccess directive:

<filesMatch "\.(html|htm|js|css)$">
FileETag None
<ifModule mod_headers.c>
Header unset ETag
Header set Cache-Control "max-age=0, no-cache, no-store, must-revalidate"
Header set Pragma "no-cache"
Header set Expires "Wed, 11 Jan 1984 05:00:00 GMT"
</ifModule>
</filesMatch>

This little trick, courtesy of AskApache, here:
http://www.askapache.com/htaccess/using-http-headers-with-htaccess.html

Tags | .htaccess, apache, browser, caching, clear, conf, disable, httpd, perpetual, persistent

15

Oct
2012

Information Resources

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By admin404

Twitter API Update Causes WordPress Widget Problem

October 15, 2012 - Information Resources

WordPress siteholders that are using a Twitter widget that requires blogger.js, might want to consider the following link:

https://dev.twitter.com/docs/api/1/get/statuses/user_timeline

which reads:

Deprecation notice!
Version 1 of the API is now deprecated. This document may describe an outdated version of the API. Please move to Version 1.1 of the API as soon as possible.

This script used to return a JSON object of recent tweets on a user timeline.

A quick fix would be to find the line in your widget (typically a PHP file) that makes a browser request to this URL and update it accordingly to the new API (v1.1).

For example, if your Twitter username is “era404” you would find:

<script type="text/javascript" src="http://twitter.com/statuses/user_timeline/era404.json?callback=twitterCallback2&count=4"></script>

And replace it with:

<script type="text/javascript" src="https://api.twitter.com/1/statuses/user_timeline.json?callback=twitterCallback2&screen_name=era404&count=4"></script>

The callback may be named something different, depending on the plugin in use, however this is how the function is called when using blogger.js.

Tags | blogger.js, quick-fix, twitter, widget, wordpress